3.10.2017

DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors [Part 1- Installation]


We are moving full steam ahead on the renovation of our attached mother-in-law apartment in preparation for my in-laws to move into it.  This past week we tackled one of the biggest projects, replacing all of the flooring in the great room and kitchen. The kitchen and dining areas still had the original linoleum and the rest of the great room had the original carpet.  Everything was in pretty bad condition and really needed to be replaced. 




DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Before | Hood Creek Log Cabin

DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Before | Hood Creek Log Cabin


DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Before | Hood Creek Log Cabin

One of the goals in our renovation of this house has been to make choices of materials that fit the house well and honor its uniqueness. The floor of the kitchen in our house is original to the build. It's 12" wide pine planks that were top nailed into the joists. The builder and original owner of our home was a wood reclaimer way back in the 1980s, before it was cool. The next time I see him I've got to remember to ask him where these boards came from because everything in this house has a story. By the way, when we renovate the kitchen, this original floor will be refinished.



DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Hood Creek Log Cabin


Plow & Hearth 

We were able to source the new #3 grade Ponderosa pine boards through a local wood supply company for $1 per square foot, and had them delivered.  They are a pretty close match to the originals. We let them sit in the room for about two weeks.

Once we were ready to get started we began going through the boards, grading them from best to worst and stacking them accordingly.  We checked for knots that went all the way through, edges that weren't perfect, discoloration, warping, and bowing. (This is toward the end, I forgot to take a photo earlier.)



DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Hood Creek Log Cabin

My Tip: One thing we didn't do but I thought of after we were done was marking each defect with a piece of blue tape.  By midway through the install the boards were all starting to look the same and we wasted a lot of time looking for the defects again to decide if a board was usable.

DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Hood Creek Log Cabin

Furniture

We laid down a layer of this vapor barrier paper.  

DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Hood Creek Log Cabin

DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Hood Creek Log Cabin

We used a square to mark the location of the floor joists on the paper, using the nail line of the subfloor as a guide.  This made it easier to keep our nail lines straight.

DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Hood Creek Log Cabin


We set the first board in place and realized the threshold piece that butts up to the tile in the hallway needed to go in first. So my husband cut a piece to fit.  In keeping with the history of the house, he repurposed one of the 2x4's from a wall we took down.  Now it remains a part of the house.

DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Hood Creek Log Cabin

 After each board was cut to size, we sanded a small bevel on the top two long edges.  This gave a nice v-groove accent between the boards.

DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Hood Creek Log Cabin



We used 1/2" thick blocks of wood as spacers between the boards and the walls.  This will allow for movement in the boards with settling and expansion. We measured from the walls to the seam in the plywood subfloor to see if that line was square, and it was. So this gave us a good way to make sure our first board was laid square.

DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Hood Creek Log Cabin

With each board we used a flooring nailer to nail the edge down and help keep the joints tight.

DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Hood Creek Log Cabin

Then we used a framing nailer with 3" screw shank nails to top nail the boards into the floor joists.  My husband made this template to keep each set of nails evenly spaced and consistent.

DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Hood Creek Log Cabin

CarolinaRustica.com Fine Furniture from North Carolina
We adjusted the nailer to set the nails about an 1/8" above the wood because the plastic collated nails we used made shards of plastic that shot into the wood and blew out the hole.  We had already invested in these nails so we made it work.  For future projects we will definitely use paper collated nails.  

DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Hood Creek Log Cabin

Grab Today's Steal!

So because of this issue, our workflow for each board was setting the nails, cleaning up the plastic shards, hammering the nail heads flush with the board, and then using a nail set to recess the nails slightly below the wood surface.

DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Hood Creek Log Cabin

When we had a butt joint of two boards, only one board actually was nailed into the floor joist.  In the photo below, it would be the board on the right.  See how those nails line up with the nails in the other boards?  We used Liquid Nails for subfloors to basically glue the ends of the two boards together, so they will move together with expansion and prevent cupping on the ends.  I didn't get a shot of the glue itself, but you get the idea.  Then we cut about an inch off of some nails to use in the board on the left.  We predrilled the holes through the boards and then nailed through into the subfloor.  This way the nails didn't blow through into the basement ceiling below.


DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Hood Creek Log Cabin

We used a jigsaw to cut out the holes for the floor vents.

DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Hood Creek Log Cabin

DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Hood Creek Log Cabin

 

A few times we ended up with a board that wasn't lining up well with the previous board, leaving a wider gap than we wanted at one end.  We ended up using our car's tire jack, braced against a board that was solidly screwed into the subfloor, to gently close the gap before we nailed the board into place.

DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Hood Creek Log Cabin

It all came together beautifully, and thankfully square to the last board! No, it was not easy, but it was totally do-able.  And we will be doing it again in other rooms as soon as we can.  So here it is all done.  Scroll back up and look at those before's to really see the difference!

DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Hood Creek Log Cabin

DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | Hood Creek Log Cabin


Here's the breakdown of the cost of this floor:  The room was 450 square feet.  The wood was $1 per square foot and we ordered about 20% extra, so $719 with delivery fees.  The box of nails was $80 but we used about a third of them so we have plenty for the next floor project.  So this floor came in under $750!  

This post was getting so long, I figured I would break it up into two posts.  See how we sanded, stained, and finished the floor at  DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors [Part 2- Finishing]

Thanks for joining us on this crazy renovation ride!

How to DIY Wide Plank Pine Floors | $1 sq ft cheap low cost | Hood Creek Log Cabin



10 comments:

  1. Wow. This is amazing. You guys are so handy. I am always impressed!

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  2. Fabulous! Joanna

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  3. Christina GodwinMay 29, 2017 at 10:41 PM

    We are following your tutorial on how to install these floors. Would you please tell me how you sealed them? I have read mixed reviews on which polyurethane is tough enough to stand the test of time. I would love to know what you did and if you stained them or not.

    Thanks!

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    Replies
    1. Hi Christina! I hope it's going well! I haven't had time to write the follow up post but I will be happy to email you everything we did. We used a water based system. Can you please email me at hoodcreeklogcabin@gmail.com and I will get right back to you.

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  4. I love this Dara!! I'm showing my husband now, we are really looking into new flooring and especially on a budget! They look amazing!

    ReplyDelete